Interpol Opens Cyber-Crime Base, Partners With Kaspersky, Trend Micro

Interpol Opens Cyber-Crime Base, Partners With Kaspersky, Trend Micro

By Tom Jowitt | Posted 2014-10-02

A new Singapore facility will help Interpol tackle cyber-crime.

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Who Is On My Wi-Fi?

http://www.whoisonmywifi.comimage

http://lifehacker.com/who-is-on-my-wi-fi-shows-you-who-else-is-using-your-net-1504773036?utm_campaign=socialflow_lifehacker_facebook&utm_source=lifehacker_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow

Appears to be a very useful tool, both at home and travel.  Article is worthy of a moment of attention.

Passwords and New Jobs…

If you have a Facebook, Twitter, or any other social networking account, can you be asked for you account and its password?  Short answer, YES they can ask but you do not have to give it up…I imagine that depends upon how badly you need the job, also.  This does seem to be the big rave on the news, other than the Obama-Care challenge.

There is software that companies tend to use to sift through the internet to find out if anyone is talking bad about their company AND people have been fired for talking bad about the company that they worked for (note the operative term “worked”).  You have an obligation to not denigrate the company you work for and many of them have policies that reflect such a thing.  If you cross the line you should be held accountable…if only it were a perfect world where everyone was held to the same standard!  But anyway…

You have a right to privacy and there are certain lines that should not be crossed.  While on Facebook, I had posted the article “Should Companies be allowed to ask for your Facebook Password?” by Tuan C. Nguyen.  Someone answered with a comment essentially saying that if a company did ask for my password I could not work for them because they acting unethically (they want their passwords to be secure, but want yours?) and it would be a security violation of password sharing which is frowned upon in the IT community.  And he is definitely right…one of the first things you are taught is security & protection.

Until the next exciting adventure!

 

References:

http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/thinking-tech/should-companies-be-allowed-to-ask-for-your-facebook-password/10872?tag=nl.e660

 

RFIDs Part 5

This segment is not actually Radio Frequency ID, but it is a related issue.  People are so hell bent on convenience that they, more often than not, fail to think of the long term and devastating possibilities.

Now you will be able to pay by using the smart technology within your phone.  there are, and will be more, applications granting access to your banking institutions to pay for your purchases.  Many of the loyalty card programs are looking into similar technology for purchase discounts.

What exactly are the ramifications for this in your life?  How secure is your phone and the signal it uses?  Most people do not even pass-code their phones, because it is inconvenient.  How inconvenient will it be when your account is wiped out?  Now your phone will contain access to all your financial data, all of your purchasing data, purchasing habits (i.e., food, clothes, technology, etc.)

By pushing everyone to use credit & debit cards the banking industry is really striving toward a cashless society.  In doing so, they are forcing everyone to make purchases with a flippant and cavalier approach and will cause much more debt spending in your life than if you were using cash.  A study was done (I heard about it on the Katherine Albrect Show http://www.katherinealbrecht.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=frontpage&Itemid=1) in which a study was done when cash money is being used to pay people tend to be more mindful on the expenditures; whereas, with the airline industry they are no longer taking cash on flights and you are forced to use credit card and you are more likely to spend more with its use.  This is because most people do not want to spend such a small amount on a card and will be more flippant with its use.

It is already a well known fact that such technology can be used to monitor your actions, expenditures, and conversations.  With the advent of many District Court decisions which permit police to do so without any warrants.

I am always concerned when privacy is concerned…it is not alright when the tech savvy peeping tom down the street does such things, but it is legal when the government does it????? hmmmmmm!

SEE ALSO:  RFID Part 1, RFID Part 2, RFID Part 3, RFID Part 4

Here are some articles to view:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2115871/The-CIA-wants-spy-TV-Agency-director-says-net-connected-gadgets-transform-surveillance.html

http://www.openforum.com/articles/belly-up-to-the-digital-loyalty-card-groupons-founders-have

http://www.statesman.com/business/new-customer-loyalty-card-good-at-100-plus-2226233.html

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/02/22/us-idtheft-javelin-idUSTRE81L16520120222

http://www.paymentobserver.com/

http://www.physorg.com/news/2012-03-mobile-industry-champions.html

 

 

Secure eMail

I recently read a c|net article about an interesting web-site and its service.  The article is “This email will self-destruct…” and mentioned the services at https://oneshar.es, which permits a person to send a one-time message; after the url is accessed one time the information is destroyed and removed from use.  I was rather curious about it and queried Mr. Cipriani about what happened to the information, of which he verified that the information was removed from the system.

This has spectacular possibilities for secure email or messaging.  There are some applications which you can encrypt the message and then you could send via oneshar.es the password or passphrase.  You could just send out a one time message to a person.  In either case, you can determine how you wish to use it, but it is one of those useful applications that may be handy to you, one day.

Keep it on the back burner for now.

http://howto.cnet.com/8301-11310_39-57377686-285/this-e-mail-will-self-destruct..–heres-how/

Passwords

I was reading an article at the InfoSecurity web-site, which had an interesting note on the psychology of passwords.  A recent survey indicated the contradiction of password security, in-that, people desire password security and that they be strong and changed often; however, these people would, themselves, not change their passwords on a regular basis nor make them difficult and strong.  Rather concerning, don’t you think?

 

http://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/view/24057/the-contradictions-of-password-psychology/?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

Browsing Privacy

In this day and age, everyone wants a little privacy, the idealistic genre has the mind “if you don’t have anything to hide, then…” kind of attitude, and as you get older you come to have a great appreciation for privacy.  There are some steps you can take to help your own privacy along.  I was reading Rob Lightner’s article for CNET, “Five Smart Ways to Keep Your Browsing Private”

 

 

  1. One of you biggest concerns is to get rid of all tracking cookies on your computer.  There is a free software that does this called CCleaner.  It is very good, I have tried it.
  2. Opting out of tracking by use of third-party software such as PrivacyChoice, which offers several tools to aid in this endeavor (I have never used it).
  3. Another thing you can do is to prevent the depositing of those tracking cookies and you can do this by making changes to you web-browser.  This is something I do and quite simple to set up.  Just search for you specific browser the way to browse privately.
  4. Anonymous browsing.  According to the article he uses a TOR set up, which I have never used but may toy with sometime.  Apparently TOR protects you via encrypted pathways, thereby protecting the anonymity of your IP address.
  5. Anonymous browsing using proxies.  This is similar to StartPage’s (www.startpage.com) Proxy setting where you use StartPage’s resources to search for something without yielding your IP address.

Of course, there is always the use of a thumb drive being set up with another operating system and setting it in such a way that you save nothing, to be totally private.  I tried this with an old version of Linux when I was in college, but my computer kept locking up.  Just couldn’t figure out what was going on.  Apparently the thumb drive itself was not very compatible with Linux, so I changed the drive and it worked great.

Hope this is useful to you!

Resource: http://howto.cnet.com/8301-11310_39-57363219-285/five-smart-ways-to-keep-your-browsing-private/