Facebook Intern Gets Preemptive Ax For Exposing Security Flaw

Original Article
from the because-they’re-all-edgy-and-wear-hoodies dept.

Engadget reports that Harvard student Aran Khanna, who was about to begin an internship at Facebook, had that internship yanked after he created (and took down, but evidently too slowly for the company’s taste) a browser plug-in that exposed a security flaw in Facebook, by allowing users to discover the location of other users when they use the Messenger app. Surely Khanna won’t be jobless or internship-less for long. (Don’t expect the app to work now; it’s still in the Chrome store as a historical artifact, though, and at GitHub.)

Posted by timothy

 

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Users question Facebook Messenger app

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Users question Facebook Messenger app
By Marjorie Sturgeon. CREATED 11:15 AM
OMAHA, Neb. (KMTV) – Facebook’s recent move to get mobile users to download its Messenger app is getting a lot of criticism.

Those who use Facebook on their mobile devices must now download the app to see messages from other users.

Facebook says Messenger, which works just like texting, will be faster and new messages will appear instantly.

Complaints left in the iTunes App Store range from privacy concerns to usability and being forced to make the change.

To avoid having to download the app, users can go to the mobile version through a web browser.

India Reported The Most Valid Bugs @Facebook Bug Bounty 2013

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Facebook received a total of 14,763 submissions in 2013, up 246 per cent from the previous year.

Saturday, April 05, 2014: Social networking giant, Facebook has revealed some statistics about its bug bounty program 2013, and it has come to light that India reported the largest number of bugs under the program last year. India accounts for roughly over 93 million Facebook users and successfully reported the most valid bugs, 136, with payouts averaging $1,353.

Facebook received a total of 14,763 submissions in 2013, up 246 per cent from the previous year, of which 687 bugs were found to be valid and eligible to receive rewards. Every submission was reviewed individually by a security engineer. Of the bugs reported, nearly 6 percent were categorised as high-severity. “India contributed the largest number of valid bugs at 136, with an average reward of $1,353 (Rs 80,000 approximately). The US reported 92 issues and averaged $2,272 (approximately Rs 1,35,000) in rewards,” Facebook quoted in a post.

Meanwhile, researchers in Russia earned the highest average amount per report in 2013, $3,961. It reported a total of 38 bugs. “We’ve paid over $2 million since we got started in 2011, and in 2013 we paid out $1.5 million to 330 researchers across the globe.” said Facebook. Most of the bugs reported were those discovered in non-core properties. “2014 is looking good so far. The volume of high-severity issues is down, and we’re hearing from researchers that it’s tougher to find good bugs,” Facebook added.

Original Article