Ubuntu To Officially Switch To systemd Next Monday

from the dissenting-dachshund dept.
jones_supa writes: Ubuntu is going live with systemd, reports Martin Pitt in the ubuntu-devel-announce mailing list. Next Monday, Vivid (15.04) will be switched to boot with systemd instead of UpStart. The change concerns desktop, server, and all other current flavors. Technically, this will flip around the preferred dependency of init to systemd-sysv | upstart in package management, which will affect new installs, but not upgrades. Upgrades will be switched by adding systemd-sysv to ubuntu-standard‘s dependencies. If you want, you can manually do the change already, but it’s advisable to do an one-time boot first. Right now it is important that if you run into any trouble, file a proper bug report in Launchpad (ubuntu-bug systemd). If after some weeks it is found that there are too many or too big regressions, Ubuntu can still revert back to UpStart.

Looking To Replace Your XP? Here Are 30 Open Source Alternatives!

20140421-200302.jpg

Original article & links

Monday, April 21, 2014: With all the Windows XP end of life fiasco now well behind us, Linux is the preferred choice for individuals and organisations alike around the world. While Linux Mint has the same look and feel as XP, Ubuntu’s recent LTS release boasts of tremendous functionality and a seamless user interface. Likewise, the world of Linux and Open Source has a lot to offer when it comes to providing you with a good alternative to the famed XP. Here are 30 Linux Operating Systems making headlines.

1.Linux Mint

The purpose of Linux Mint is to produce a modern, elegant and comfortable operating system which is both powerful and easy to use. Started in 2006, Linux Mint is now the 4th most widely used home operating system behind Microsoft Windows, Apple Mac OS and Canonical’s Ubuntu.

2.Ubuntu

Ubuntu is a Debian-based Linux operating system, with Unity as its default desktop environment (GNOME was the previous desktop environment).

3.Zorin OS

Zorin OS is a multi-functional operating system designed specifically newcomers to Linux. It is based on Ubuntu which is the most popular desktop Linux operating system in the world.

4.MEPIS

MEPIS is a set of Linux distributions, distributed as Live CDs that can be installed onto a hard disk drive. The most popular MEPIS distribution is SimplyMEPIS, which is based primarily on Debian stable. It can either be installed onto a hard drive or used as a Live CD, which makes it externally bootable for troubleshooting and repairing many operating systems. It includes the KDE desktop environment.

5.Manjaro

Manjaro is a user-friendly Linux distribution based on the independently developed Arch operating system. Manjaro provides all the benefits of the Arch operating system combined with a focus on user-friendliness and accessibility. Available in both 32 and 64 bit versions, Manjaro is suitable for newcomers as well as experienced Linux users.

6.PCLinuxOS

PCLinuxOS is distributed as a LiveCD, and can also be installed to your computer. The LiveCD mode lets you try PCLInuxOS without making any changes to your computer. If you like it, you can install the operating system to your hard drive. Locally installed versions of PCLinuxOS utilise the Advanced Packaging Tool (or APT), a package management system (originally from the Debian distribution), together with Synaptic, a GUI frontend to APT for easy software installation.

7.Mageia

Mageia is a Linux computer operating system, distributed as free and open source software. It is forked from the Mandriva Linux distribution.

8.OpenMandriva

OpenMandriva Lx is an exciting free Desktop Operating System that aims to cater to and interest first time and advanced users alike. It has the breadth and depth of an advanced system but is designed to be simple and straightforward in use.

9.Kubuntu

Kubuntu is an operating system built by a worldwide team of expert developers. It contains all the applications you need: a web browser, an office suite, media apps, an instant messaging client and many more.

10.Netrunner

Netrunner is a KDE focused, complete OS. It comes in two variants, one is built on Kubuntu/Debian (Main/Standard Release), one is built on Manjaro/Arch (Rolling Release).

11.Point Linux

Point Linux is a GNU/Linux distribution that aims to combine the power of Debian GNU/Linux with the productivity of MATE, the Gnome 2 desktop environment fork. Point Linux provides an easy to set up and use distribution for users, looking for a fast, stable and predictable desktop.

12.Korara

Originally based on Gentoo Linux in 2005, Korora was re-born in 2010 as a Fedora Remix with tweaks and extras to make the system “just work” out of the box.

13.Sabayon

Sabayon Linux or Sabayon (formerly RR4 Linux and RR64 Linux), is a Gentoo-based Linux distribution created by Fabio Erculiani and the Sabayon development team. Sabayon follows the “out of the box” philosophy, aiming to give the user a wide number of applications ready to use and a self-configured operating system.

14.Trisquel

Trisquel (officially known as Trisquel GNU/Linux) is a Linux operating system based on the Ubuntu Linux distribution. The project aims for a fully free software system without proprietary software or firmware and uses Linux-libre – a version of the Linux kernel with the non-free code (binary blobs) removed.

15.KNOPPIX

Knoppix, or KNOPPIX is an operating system based on Debian designed to be run directly from a CD / DVD (Live CD) or a USB flash drive (Live USB), one of the first of its kind for any operating system. Knoppix was developed by Linux consultant Klaus Knopper.

16.Lubuntu

Lubuntu is a fast and lightweight operating system developed by a community of Free and Open Source enthusiasts. The core of the system is based on Linux and Ubuntu . Lubuntu uses the minimal desktop LXDE, and a selection of light applications.

17.Peppermint

Peppermint Linux OS is a cloud-centric OS based on Lubuntu, a derivative of the Ubuntu Linux operating system that uses the LXDE desktop environment.

18.Xubuntu

Xubuntu is an elegant and easy-to-use operating system. Xubuntu comes with Xfce, which is a stable, light and configurable desktop environment.

19.Elementary OS

Elementary OS is a Linux distribution based on Ubuntu. It makes use of a desktop with its own shell named Pantheon, and is deeply integrated with other elementary OS applications like Plank (a dock based on Docky), Midori (the default web browser) and Scratch (a simple text editor).

20.Puppy

Puppy Linux operating system is a lightweight Linux distribution that focuses on ease of use and minimal memory footprint. The entire system can be run from RAM with current versions generally taking up about 130 MB, allowing the boot medium to be removed after the operating system has started.

21.Bodhi Linux

Bodhi Linux is a Linux Distribution leveraging the fast, customisable, and beautiful Enlightenment Desktop. Enlightenment coupled with a minimal set of utilities such as a browser, text editor, and package management tools form the solid foundation of Bodhi Linux.

22.Linux Lite

Linux Lite is free for everyone to use and share, and is suitable for people who are new to Linux or for people who want a lightweight environment that is also fully functional. Linux Lite is also great for reviving that old laptop or desktop you gave up on a few years back.

23.AntiX

AntiX is a fast, lightweight and easy to install linux live CD distribution based on Debian Testing for Intel-AMD x86 compatible systems. It offers users the “antiX Magic” in an environment suitable for old computers.

24.Damn Small Linux (DSL)

DSL was originally developed as an experiment to see how many usable desktop applications can fit inside a 50MB live CD. It was at first just a personal tool/toy. But over time Damn Small Linux grew into a community project with thousands of development hours put into refinements including a fully automated remote and local application installation system and a very versatile backup and restore system which may be used with any writable media including a USB device, floppy disk, or a hard drive.

25.CrunchBang

CrunchBang is a Debian GNU/Linux based distribution offering a great blend of speed, style and substance. Using the nimble Openbox window manager, it is highly customisable and provides a modern, full-featured GNU/Linux system without sacrificing performance.

26.Fedora

Fedora is a Linux-based operating system, a collection of software that makes your computer run. You can use Fedora in addition to, or instead of, other operating systems such as Microsoft Windows or Mac OS X.

27.CentOS

The CentOS Linux distribution is a stable, predictable, manageable and reproduceable platform derived from the sources of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL).

28.SUSE

SUSE is the original provider of the enterprise Linux distribution and the most interoperable platform for mission-critical computing. It’s the only Linux recommended by VMware, Microsoft and SAP. And it’s supported on more hardware and software than any other enterprise Linux distribution.

29.openSUSE

openSUSE is a general purpose operating system built on top of the Linux kernel, developed by the community-supported openSUSE Project and sponsored by SUSE and a number of other companies.

30.Edubuntu

Edubuntu, also previously known as Ubuntu Education Edition, is an official derivative of the Ubuntu operating system designed for use in classrooms inside schools, homes and communities. Edubuntu has been developed in collaboration with teachers and technologists in multiple countries. Edubuntu is built on top of the Ubuntu base, incorporates the LTSP thin client architecture and several education-specific applications, and is aimed at users aged 6 to 18.

Source: Datamation

Saurabh Singh, EFYTIMES News Network

Malware Attack Infected 25,000 Linux/UNIX Servers

from the sudo-configure-your-stuff-properly dept.
wiredmikey writes

20140322-150832.jpg

Security researchers from ESET have uncovered a widespread attack campaign that has infected more than 25,000 Linux and UNIX servers around the world. The servers are being hijacked by a backdoor Trojan as part of a campaign the researchers are calling ‘Operation Windigo.’ Once infected, victimized systems are leveraged to steal credentials, redirected web traffic to malicious sites and send as many as 35 million spam messages a day. ‘Windigo has been gathering strength, largely unnoticed by the security community, for more than two and a half years and currently has 10,000 servers under its control,’ said Pierre-Marc Bureau, security intelligence program manager at ESET, in a statement.

There are many misconceptions around Linux security, and attacks are not something only Windows users need to worry about. The main threats facing Linux systems aren’t zero-day vulnerabilities or malware, but things such as Trojanized applications, PHP backdoors, and malicious login attempts over SSH. ESET recommends webmasters and system administrators check their systems to see if they are compromised, and has published a detailed report presenting the findings and instructions on how to remove the malicious code if it is present.

Everything You Wanted To Know About The Linux Kernel

Original article

20140318-091713.jpg

We demystify the Linux Kernel by bringing forth some features that are common to all versions of Linux OS.

Wednesday, September 25, 2013: Linux Kernel is a piece of code that is common to all versions of Linux. Proper understanding of the Linux kernel allows you to modify the operating system (OS) so as to incorporate support for the features you want. Every Linux kernel comes with these features:

20140318-091829.jpg

Multiuser – You can not only have multiple user accounts on a Linux system, but can also have multiple users logged in and working on the system simultaneously. Also, the users can arrange their own environments the way they want. It is possible to have user accounts password-protected, so that users can monitor who gets access to their applications and data.

Multitasking – In Linux, it is possible to have several programs running together, which means that you can not only have multiple programs running together, but that the Linux OS can itself have programs running in the background. Majority of these system processes make it feasible for Linux to work as a server with numerous background processes responding to the network for requests to log in to your system, display an Internet page, print a document, or copy a file.

Graphical user interface (X Window System) – The robust framework for working with graphical applications in Linux is dubbed as the X Window System (or simply X). X manages the functions of opening X-based graphical user interface (GUI) applications and showing them on an X server process (the process that controls your screen, mouse, and keyboard).

Hardware support – It is possible to organize support for roughly every type of hardware which can be connected to a pc. You can get support for floppy disk drives, CD-ROMs, removable disks, sound cards, video cards, tape devices, and lots of other things you can think of.

Networking connectivity – Linux provides support for a range of local area network cards to connect your Linux system to a network, modems, and serial devices. Additionally, LAN protocols, including Ethernet -both wired and wireless, all the most admired upper-level networking protocols can be integrated. TCP/IP is the most popular of these protocols is which is used for connecting to the Internet while other protocols, such as IPX and X.25 are also available.

Network servers – Linux provides best networking services to the client computers on the LAN and also to the entire Internet. It offers you a range of software packages to enable you to use Linux as a print server, file server, FTP server, mail server, Web server, news server, or workgroup (DHCP or NIS) server.

Application support – Due to the compatibility with POSIX and various other application programming interfaces (APIs), a large variety of freeware and shareware software is available for Linux. Majority of GNU software from the Free Software Foundation will run in Linux.

Source: searchitchannel.techtarget.com