Jeb Bush Comes Out Against Encryption

from the not-so-cryptic-statements dept.

An anonymous reader writes:

Presidential candidate Jeb Bush has called on tech companies to form a more “cooperative” arrangement with intelligence agencies. During a speech in South Carolina, Bush made clear his opinion on encryption: “If you create encryption, it makes it harder for the American government to do its job — while protecting civil liberties — to make sure that evildoers aren’t in our midst.” He also indicated he felt the recent scaling back of the Patriot Act went too far. Bush says he hasn’t seen any indication the bulk collection of phone metadata violated anyone’s civil liberties.

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Facebook Intern Gets Preemptive Ax For Exposing Security Flaw

Original Article
from the because-they’re-all-edgy-and-wear-hoodies dept.

Engadget reports that Harvard student Aran Khanna, who was about to begin an internship at Facebook, had that internship yanked after he created (and took down, but evidently too slowly for the company’s taste) a browser plug-in that exposed a security flaw in Facebook, by allowing users to discover the location of other users when they use the Messenger app. Surely Khanna won’t be jobless or internship-less for long. (Don’t expect the app to work now; it’s still in the Chrome store as a historical artifact, though, and at GitHub.)

Posted by timothy

 

Windows 10’s Privacy Policy: the New Normal?

from the no-i-do-not-want-to-send-a-crash-report dept.

An anonymous reader writes:

The launch of Windows 10 brought a lot of users kicking and screaming to the “connected desktop.” Its benefits come with tradeoffs: “the online service providers can track which devices are making which requests, which devices are near which Wi-Fi networks, and feasibly might be able to track how devices move around. The service providers will all claim that the data is anonymized, and that no persistent tracking is performed… but it almost certainly could be.” There are non-trivial privacy concerns, particularly for default settings. 
According to Peter Bright, for better or worse this is the new normal for mainstream operating systems. We’re going to have to either get used to it, or get used to fighting with settings to turn it all off. “The days of mainstream operating systems that don’t integrate cloud services, that don’t exploit machine learning and big data, that don’t let developers know which features are used and what problems occur, are behind us, and they’re not coming back. This may cost us some amount of privacy, but we’ll tend to get something in return: software that can do more things and that works better.”

Posted by Soulskill 2 days ago