The Reason For Java’s Staying Power

The Reason For Java’s Staying Power: It’s Easy To Readfrom the easy-on-the-eyes dept.

jfruh writes:

Java made its public debut twenty years ago today, and despite a sometimes bumpy history that features its parent company being absorbed by Oracle, it’s still widely used. Mark Reinhold, chief architect for the Oracle’s Java platform group, offers one explanation for its continuing popularity: it’s easy for humans to understand it at a glance. “It is pretty easy to read Java code and figure out what it means. There aren’t a lot of obscure gotchas in the language … Most of the cost of maintaining any body of code over time is in maintenance, not in initial creation.”

Posted by samzenpus 3 days ago

MSpy Hacked

from the have-some-information dept.
pdclarry writes: mSpy sells a software-as-a-service package that claims to allow you to spy on iPhones. It is used by ~2 million people to spy on their children, partners, Exes, etc. The information gleaned is stored on mSpy’s servers. Brian Krebs reports that mSpy has been hacked and their entire database of several hundred GB of their customer’s data has been posted on the Dark Web. The trove includes Apple IDs and passwords, as well as the complete contents of phones that have mSpy installed. So much for keeping your children safe.

USBKill turns thumb drives into computer kill switches

original article 

A coder that goes by the online handle “Hephaestos” has shared with the world a Python script that, when put on an USB thumb drive, turns the device in an effective kill switch for the computer in which it’s plugged in.


USBkill, as the programmer dubbed it, “waits for a change on your USB ports, then immediately kills your computer.”

The device would be useful “in case the police comes busting in, or steals your laptop from you when you are at a public library (as with Ross [Ulbricht]),” Hephaestos explained. 

Using a cord to attach the USB key to one’s wrist will assure that the USB is removed instantly with a quick tug upon the arrest of the user or the seizure of the computer. 

Of course, if the user doesn’t use full disk encryption in the first place, the device becomes useless.

Hephaestos says that USBkill is still in the early stages, but that it works, and works well.



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