Malware Part 2

As mentioned in part 1, there are a great number of people out there who want your information…its not personal, its just business.  The only way to protect yourself is to keep your anti-virus software, anti-spyware, and anti-malware up-to-date.  And unfortunately that is not always enough!

We each must take greater control of the reins, so-to-say.  There are a plethora of sites out there with information on all of the latest viruses, spyware, and malware out there.

At the command prompt you can run a “netstat -an”: the a option displays all connections and listening ports; the n option displays IP addresses and port numbers in numerical order for easier readability.

You will see something similar to Figure 1 [refer to Malware Figures:Figure1] which will yield the status of your network with relation to your computer.  NetBIOS networking ports (135, 137, 138, 139, & 445) and an HTTP connection (port 80), telnet port (23), and FTP session port (20 and 21).  Hackers and malware can use common ports to infiltrate your network and computer(s).  I found an interesting ports list which is quite extensive.  It gives you a good amount of information and what specific malware or virus may use that port.  Use of the “netstat -at” allows you to view active network connections. [refer to Malware Figures:Figure2]

And there is the “net use” command at the command prompt which shows you what drives are mapped to an external system. [refer to Malware Figures:Figure3]

You can also find a variety of free tools via McAfee to aid in detection, removal, or personal training and knowledge.  One that is tauted as being very useful is Vision which is a port mapping utility.  Just perform a search on the internet, but I would be careful as to which you download to use.  The best thing to do is to check on various sites such as PC World, C|Net, and other reputable informative sites.

Your Task Manager is a wealth of information (CNTL + ALT + DEL) which shows you what processes are taking place and their memory consumption. [refer to Malware Figures:Figure4]

And the performance tab will show how it is performing with all of the extras running in the background. [refer to Malware Figures:Figure5]

There is quite a bit at your disposal to determine what is going on.  The internet, blogs, and many of the how to sites contain a wealth of information and everything you ever wanted to know about either your computer problem or how to understand what is happening and how to fix it.  YouTube.com is also another great tool for how to’s and Wikipedia is a good source of info – PROVIDED THAT YOU RESEARCH THE FOOTNOTES AND SOURCES! Take nothing for granted on that site, as it can change with the wind.

Malware Figures

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s